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Ten Ways NOT to Set Up a Website-Based Service Business
By : Cathy Goodwin, Ph.D.

1. As the first step, "Hire a web designer."

First develop strategy and copy. Start with my Special Report:
5C's of client-attracting copy (free to subscribers of the Copy-Cat Ezine: http://www.makewritingpay.com/subscribe.html).

2. Focus on graphics, typefaces and colors.

Focus on potential clients and customers.

3. Avoid anything that has to do with "strategy."

Spend more time on strategy than on website design.

4. Rely on your web designer for all the updates.

Only if your designer is also your significant other! You may need to make changes as often as once a day. Even if you have infinite financial resources, your designer may not have infinite time for you.

5. Avoid learning HTML.

You need a smattering of HTML even if you use a package. If something goes wrong, you'll save time if you can take a quick peek at the source code.

6. Take a course in web design after your site has gone public.

You may not need a course. Begin with a practice website, using a free package like Netscape's Composer, or PageMill, which has been bundled with iMacs. Most ISP's offer free websites for personal use. Don't use the "quick design" option: Write your own code and practice uploading!

7. Rely on submitting your name to search engines to generate traffic.

Supplement by submitting content to popular sites.

8. Refuse to pay for a pro to help with writing web content.

If your strength lies in pictoral or oral communication, get help! Words count.
Learn more.

9. Ignore your competitive websites.

Don't steal what's copyrighted, but learn from everybody else.

10. Create a concept that requires more than three sentences to explain.

You're lucky if your audience listens beyond the first sentence.
 

 

 

About the Author :
Cathy Goodwin, Ph.D., helps midcareer professionals take the First Step to their Second Careers. Weekly Your Next Move Ezine: mailto:subscribe@cathygoodwin.com

 
 
 
 
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